Marriage and dating middle ages

In England some people did marry near churches to give greater spiritual weight to proceedings, often at the church door (leading to some rather fabulous church porches being added to earlier buildings), but this still did not necessarily involve a priest.Marriage was the only acceptable place for sex and as a result Christians were allowed to marry from puberty onwards, generally seen at the time as age 12 for women and 14 for men. When this law finally changed in England in the 18th century, the old rules still applied in Scotland, making towns just over the border, such as Gretna Green, a destination for English couples defying their families.Rather, they were forced to suffer lowest degrees of servitude.While Roman despots were culminated, people found thousands of tyrants trying to exploit them and that gave rise to feudalism which significantly changed the customs of general public.

This fusion of cultures was basically promoted by Kings and lords like Charlemagne.

Getting married in the medieval period was incredibly simple for Christians living in western Europe – all they had to do was say their “I do’s” to each other.

But, as Sally Dixon-Smith reveals, proving that you were Medieval marriage practice continues to influence ceremonies today – from banns [the reading three times of your intention to marry] to declaring vows in the present tense.

It was even possible that in times of land shortage, family interference in marriage was less common because they had nothing to bargain with.

When someone says the word marriage today we think about two people who are in love and who want to spend the rest of their lives with each other.

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