Dating a japanese fender strat Chat to girls in my aera free

To maintain and control costs over the years, Squier instruments have been produced in several nations, including Japan, Korea, India, China, Indonesia and Mexico. He moved to Boston in 1881, where he built and repaired violins with his son, Victor Carroll (V. To this day, their violins are noted for their exceptional varnishes, and they command high prices as fine examples of early U. In the 1930s, Squier began making strings for the era's new electric instruments; the company also sold pianos, radios and phonograph records until divesting itself of all string-related products in 1961. Squier Company became an official original equipment manufacturer for Fender in 1963, and Fender bought the V. Squier string company in early 1965 shortly before Fender itself was bought by CBS in May of that year.

When Squier versions of these instruments appeared, demand for them as the "official" cost-conscious alternatives was immediate, and a brand name was reborn. B." Squier, a young English immigrant who arrived in Battle Creek, Mich., in the latter part of the 19th century, was a farmer and shoemaker who had learned the fine European art of violin making. Squier violin, banjo and guitar strings became well known nationwide and were especially popular among students because of their reasonable price.

While the brand has produced its share of innovative designs over the past 25 years, its main focus and most successful approach has always been to be the "value brand" alternative to its big brother, Fender. Fender entered the picture in the 1950s, when the V. Squier Company began supplying Southern California inventor and businessman Leo Fender with strings for his unusual new electric guitars. By the mid-1970s, the Squier name was retired as the strings had taken the Fender name.

S.-trained violin makers and is often referred to as "the American Stradivarius." Victor returned to Battle Creek, where he opened his own shop in 1890. With a limited market for violins in Battle Creek, however, Squier astutely sought relationships with national music schools and famous violinists.

Definition: lawsuit guitars are high quality copies of popular American brand name guitars (like Fender and Gibson) produced by Japanese companies in the 1970s.

The Squier Strat is one facet of the guitar market which comes steeped in hype, and I wanted to provide a bit of balance amid what can sometimes be wishful, hysterically over-gushing, or just plain misinformed rhetoric.This is one of the most frustrating questions from the MIJ collector.As I've read many different guitar collector/enthusiast forums and spoken to local guitar dealers, it's clear that the layperson has little to no idea who made their badged guitar from the 1960-1980 period, also known as the MIJ golden age of guitar manufacturing.I don't know if some of the listed guitars are indeed valuable.My sole purpose is to help people looking specifically for information on the maker of their MIJ guitar.The promise of a new, revitalized Fender dawned in the early 1980s as the dismal CBS era wound down, and concerned Fender officials noted the abundance of Japanese guitar makers who were blatantly copying—in some cases cloning—original vintage Fender designs with great accuracy and low costs, albeit with some occasionally bizarre details.In one particularly galling instance, for example, one manufacturer used headstock logos closely resembling those of original pre-CBS Fender guitars, but using the words "Tokai" (with a large backward uncrossed "F"), "Springy Sound" instead of "Stratocaster," "Breezy Sound" instead of "Telecaster," "Oldies but Goldies" instead of "Original Contour Body" and —the last straw— "This is the exact replica of the good old Strat" instead of "Fender Musical Instruments" in small print below the main logo. Fender acted by setting up its own official Japanese manufacturing operation, Fender Japan, in March 1982. S.-Japanese venture, Fender Japan produced guitars with material and technical support from Fender's U. facilities; Japanese manufacturing facilities even included factories that had been producing the aforementioned Fender copies.Some manufacturers merged or changed hands over the years which added to the confusion, sometime merging with another maker, only to pick up their name later. Listed below are the major manufacturers, known badges and suspected badges to the best of my knowledge in written and list form to make it easy to find out !In some cases a manufacturer would farm out production to various manufacturers, making it still more difficult to know who made the guitar in your hands. In some cases I won't know because the badge you have may be extremely rare and virtually unknown to even seasoned collectors.Warning: At the bottom of this page is a listing of current Ebay auctions that claim to sell lawsuit guitars.There are still gems to be found and a lot of these auctions are genuine, but some of the lawsuit guitars found on Ebay are not lawsuit guitars at all.

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